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The first smile: spontaneous smiles in newborn Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata)

Overview of attention for article published in Primates, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 541)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
33 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
28 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
Title
The first smile: spontaneous smiles in newborn Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata)
Published in
Primates, August 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10329-016-0558-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fumito Kawakami, Masaki Tomonaga, Juri Suzuki

Abstract

Spontaneous smiles are facial movements that are characterized by lip corner raises that occur during irregular sleep or drowsiness without known external or internal causes. They are shown by human infants and infant chimpanzees. These smiles are considered to be the developmental origin of smiling and laughter. There are some case studies showing that spontaneous smiles occur in Japanese macaques. The goals of this study were to investigate whether newborn Japanese macaques show a considerable number of spontaneous smiles thus to examine the mechanism of them. Seven newborn Japanese macaques were observed in a room for an average of 44 min, and incidental sleeping situations were monitored twice. All seven participants showed spontaneous smiles at least once during the observation. They showed 8.29 spontaneous smiles in average (SD = 10.89; 58 smiles in total), all found in the state of REM sleep. Thirty-nine of the 58 smiles were produced on the left side of the mouth. These characteristics were similar to those of spontaneous smiles in human infants. This is the first evidence that macaques as well as hominoids show a considerable number of spontaneous smiles. These phenomena may facilitate the development of the zygomaticus major muscle, which is implicated in smiling-like facial expressions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 7%
Unknown 14 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 20%
Student > Master 3 20%
Researcher 3 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 33%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 13%
Unspecified 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 13%
Neuroscience 2 13%
Other 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 303. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2017.
All research outputs
#29,127
of 11,467,888 outputs
Outputs from Primates
#7
of 541 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,780
of 263,715 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Primates
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,467,888 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 541 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,715 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.